Annual Africa Utility Overview, 2016

A Combination of Region-specific Solutions and Disinvestment of Public Power Assets to Build a Diverse Private Energy Mix Will Help Africa Benefit fro

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This Research Service covers the key trends and thought leadership associated with the African Utility Landscape, both from a water and an energy perspective, analysed during the 2016 African Utility Week hosted in Cape Town. Public and private sector leaders were invited to attend streams focusing on: power generation, transmission, distribution, renewable energy, finance stream, water / hydro, metering and nuclear. The African Utility Landscape is faced with outdated infrastructure, the introduction of new technology types such as wind and solar, the introduction of standardised institutional documents such as provided by PowerAfrica, coupled with challenges in the access to funding and financing aspects of project finance.

The African utility space is balanced between the old and the new. Old = dated infrastructure; new = new business models, new economies of scale, new financing options and interest from the global market. It is vital that both the public and the private sector have a firm grasp on what is needed to ensure commercial and operational success going forward

Some of the key industry challenges include:Lack of local knowledge, lack of access to funding, lack of economies of scale, lack of standardised contracts and institutions. All of these can be overcome by tracking market trends and planning accordingly on both the public and the private sector side.

To conclude, the purpose of the research service is to provide oversight of the sub-Saharan themes and developments in the power and water utility space.
Specific trends include: introduction of new technologies, new business models, cost reflective tariffs, increased levels of privitisation, standardisation.
Challenges include: lack of economies of scale, public sector red-tape, access to funding / financing, dated infrastructure, competing markets.
Opportunities include: modular solutions, digitisation, technology leapfrogging, localisation.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. Executive Summary
3. Generation (Including Renewables)
The Baseload Energy Mix for Africa
Clean Energy Options for Africa
Hydropower
The Generation Capacity of Solar PV and its Scalability
Biomass
Conclusion
Future Outlook
4. Transmission and Distribution
Reforming Africa’s Electricity Markets: Single-buyer Model Versus Wholesale Competition
Cost-reflective Tariffs: A Solution to Utilities’ Funding Gap?
Conclusion
Future Outlook
5. Metering and Revenue Cycle Management
Market Overview
Conclusion
Future Outlook
6. Efficiency, Embedded Generation, and Energy Storage
Water and Energy Synergies: Save Money, Water and Energy
Energy Management
Distributed Defectors: When Customers Leave the Grid
Conclusion
Future Outlook
7. Water
Introduction
Increasing Access to Supply and System Input Volume (SIV)
Reduce Operational Costs
Conclusion
Future Outlook
8. Africa Power Finance and Investment Forum
Introduction
Enabling Environment
Bankable Projects
Risk Allocation
Risk Reduction
Currency Risk
Sovereign Support
Credit Enhancement Tools
Government Considerations
The Changing Role of the Developer and Financier
Role of the Developer
Role of the Financier
Financiers Choose Green
Conclusion
Future Outlook
9. Nuclear
Public and Private Sector Uncertainty Surrounding the Reality of Nuclear
New Nuclear Technology Types
How to Successfully Develop Nuclear Projects
Localisation Opportunities
Conclusion
Future Outlook
10. Legal Disclaimer
11. The Frost & Sullivan Story


List of Figures & Charts

1. Potential of Non-Renewable Fuel Sources, Africa, 2016
2. Annual African Utility Overview: Africa’s Hydropower Potential and Utilisation, Africa, 2013
3. Flowchart of the Single-buyer Model
4. Flowchart of the Wholesale-competition Model
5. Communication in the Future Grid Infrastructure
6. Water Availability on Earth
7. Designs for Inline Turbines Generating Power from Excess Flow
8. Development Process for Effective EnMS
9. Changing Role of Utilities, South Africa, 2016
10. Bridging the Gap in Water Supply Chain in Africa
11. Annual African Utility Overview: International Best Practice IWA Model, Water Balance and Terminology, Africa, 2016
12. The Impact of Non-Revenue Water across Select African Countries, Africa, 2015
13. The Universe of Risk Tolerance, Africa, 2015
14. Foreign Current Rating of SBSA’s Presence Countries (S&P), Africa, 2015
15. Annual African Utility Overview: Financiers Active in Clean Energy Investment, Africa, 2004–2016


1. Energy Charges by End-user Segment and Country, Global, 2014
2. Smart Electricity Meter Market: Unit Forecast by Region, Africa, 2012–2024
3. Opportunities for Private and Public Sector Participation in Africa’s Water Supply Chain, Africa, 2016
4. Annual African Utility Overview: Average Electricity Tariffs in the SAPP Region, Africa, 2015
5. Annual African Utility Overview: DFI Contribution to IPP Investments, Africa, 1990–2013
6. Potential Currency Mismatch, Africa, 2016
7. Annual African Utility Overview: Risk, Scope, and Enforceability of Obligations, Africa, 2016
8. Annual African Utility Overview: Global Funding Entity Trends, Africa, 2010–2013
9. Annual African Utility Overview: Global Clean Energy Investment Versus Crude Oil Spot Price, Global, 2004–2015
10. Annual African Utility Overview: Investment in Power Capacity, Global, 2008–2015
11. Annual African Utility Overview: New Investment in Clean Energy, Africa, 2004–2015



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