Power Infrastructure Tracker in Northern Africa

Power Infrastructure Tracker in Northern Africa

Can the Region Diversify its Energy Mix Away from Fossil Fuels to the Benefit of Renewable Energies?

RELEASE DATE
12-Dec-2013
REGION
South Asia, Middle East & North Africa
Research Code: M955-01-00-00-00
SKU: EG00106-SA-MR_00601

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Description

Northern African countries need significant investments in their power infrastructure, as existing infrastructure cannot meet the increasing power demand. However, since early 2011, the year of the start of the Arab spring protests, instability in the region has been high, particularly in Libya, Egypt, and Tunisia. This political instability, causing security issues, has been detrimental to the development of the region's power sector. Further development of the sector will be dependent upon the success of the transition process. This is particularly the case in Libya, Egypt, and Tunisia, as foreign investors have adopted a wait-and-see attitude. Nevertheless, each government has set up ambitious plans to develop renewable energies.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Executive Summary (continued)

Scope and Definitions

Regional Overview—Political and Economic Outlook

Regional Overview—Political and Economic Outlook(continued)

Regional Overview—GDP Growth

Regional Overview—GDP Growth (continued)

Regional Overview—Access to Electricity and Electricity Consumption per Capita

Regional Overview—Power Statistics Summary

Regional Overview—Energy Mix

Drivers and Restraints

Drivers Explained

Drivers Explained (continued)

Restraints Explained

Restraints Explained (continued)

Morocco—Macro Context

Morocco—Power Sector Public Participants

Morocco—Power Sector Structure

Morocco—Power Sector Statistics

Morocco—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure

Morocco—Existing Power Transmission Infrastructure

Morocco—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects

Morocco—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Morocco—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Morocco—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Morocco—Installed Capacity Forecast

Morocco—Energy Mix of Power Generation Infrastructure Projects

Morocco—Power Transmission Infrastructure Projects

Morocco—Key Strategic Takeaways

Algeria—Macro Context

Algeria—Power Sector Public Participants

Algeria—Power Sector Public Participants (continued)

Algeria—Power Sector Structure

Algeria—Power Sector Statistics

Algeria—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure

Algeria—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure (continued)

Algeria—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure (continued)

Algeria—Existing Power Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure

Algeria—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects

Algeria—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Algeria—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Algeria—Installed Capacity Forecast (continued)

Algeria—Energy Mix of Power Generation Infrastructure Projects

Algeria—Power Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Projects

Algeria—Key Strategic Takeaways

Tunisia—Macro Context

Tunisia—Power Sector Public Participants

Tunisia—Power Sector Structure

Tunisia—Power Sector Statistics

Tunisia—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure

Tunisia—Existing Power Infrastructure: Generation (continued)

Tunisia—Existing Power Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure

Tunisia—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure

Tunisia—Power Generation Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Tunisia—Installed Capacity Forecast

Tunisia—Energy Mix of Power Infrastructure Projects

Tunisia—Power Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Projects

Tunisia—Key Strategic Takeaways

Libya—Power Sector Overview: Macro Context

Libya—Power Sector Overview: Public Participants

Libya—Power Sector Overview

Libya—Power Sector Statistics

Libya—Power Sector Structure

Libya—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure

Libya—Existing Power Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure

Libya—Damages to Existing Power Infrastructure From the Revolution

Libya—On-going Power Generation Infrastructure Projects

Libya—On-going Transmission and Distribution Substation Projects

Libya—On-going Transmission and Distribution Line Projects

Libya—Key Strategic Takeaways

Egypt—Macro Context

Egypt—Power Sector Public Participants

Egypt—Power Sector Overview

Egypt—Power Sector Overview (continued)

Egypt—Power Sector Structure

Egypt—Power Sector Overview: Statistics

Egypt—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure

Egypt—Existing Power Generation Infrastructure (continued)

Egypt—Existing Power Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure

Egypt—Key Strategic Takeaways

Regional Integration—Existing Grid Interconnection

Regional Integration—Power Trading

Regional Integration—Projected Grid Interconnection

Regional Integration—Projected Grid Interconnection (continued)

Regional Integration—Projected Grid Interconnection Analysis

Conclusions

Conclusions (continued)

The Last Word—Three Big Predictions

Legal Disclaimer

Market Engineering Methodology

Learn More—Next Steps

Table of Acronyms Used

Table of Acronyms Used (continued)

Table of Acronyms Used (continued)

Table of Acronyms Used (continued)

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Related Research
Northern African countries need significant investments in their power infrastructure, as existing infrastructure cannot meet the increasing power demand. However, since early 2011, the year of the start of the Arab spring protests, instability in the region has been high, particularly in Libya, Egypt, and Tunisia. This political instability, causing security issues, has been detrimental to the development of the region's power sector. Further development of the sector will be dependent upon the success of the transition process. This is particularly the case in Libya, Egypt, and Tunisia, as foreign investors have adopted a wait-and-see attitude. Nevertheless, each government has set up ambitious plans to develop renewable energies.
More Information
No Index Yes
Podcast No
Author Celine Paton
Industries Energy
WIP Number M955-01-00-00-00
Is Prebook No