Power Infrastructure Tracker in East Africa

Power Infrastructure Tracker in East Africa

Large Investment and Infrastructure Development to Drive Diversification of Energy Mix

RELEASE DATE
20-Jan-2014
REGION
Africa
Research Code: M977-01-00-00-00
SKU: EG01619-AF-TC_17518
$4,950.00
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Description

This study analyses the power infrastructure sector in East African countries of Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda and covers electricity generation, transmission and distribution. East Africa has the lowest access to electrical power and smallest per capita generation, as compared to the other regions in the African continent. The demand for electricity in East Africa is expected to grow at approximately 5.3%, annually. Governments in this region have prioritised energy development and diversification. The potential for development of power infrastructure creates substantial opportunities for investors, globally. This study delves into the unique opportunities and challenges of the East African region and individual countries.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Executive Summary (continued)

Key Questions this Study will Answer

Project Scope

Project Scope (continued)

Methodology

Regional Overview

Regional Overview (continued)

Regional Overview (continued)

Regional Overview (continued)

Regional Overview (continued)

Regional Overview (continued)

Regional Overview (continued)

Regional Overview (continued)

Market Drivers and Restraints

Drivers Explained

Drivers Explained (continued)

Drivers Explained (continued)

Restraints Explained

Restraints Explained (continued)

Restraints Explained (continued)

Restraints Explained (continued)

Country Overview

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview

Current Power Infrastructure

Current Power Infrastructure (continued)

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Power Infrastructure Participants

Outlook and Conclusion

Outlook and Conclusion (continued)

Country Overview

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview

Current Power Infrastructure

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects

Future Power Infrastructure Projects

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Power Infrastructure Participants

Power Infrastructure Participants (continued)

Outlook and Conclusion

Country Overview

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview (continued)

Current Power Infrastructure

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Power Infrastructure Participants

Power Infrastructure Participants (continued)

Outlook and Conclusion

Country Overview

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview (continued)

Power Infrastructure Sector Overview (continued)

Current Power Infrastructure

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Ongoing Power Infrastructure Projects (continued)

Future Power Infrastructure Projects

Power Infrastructure Participants

Outlook and Conclusion

The Last Word—Three Big Predictions

Legal Disclaimer

Table of Acronyms Used

Table of Acronyms Used (continued)

Table of Acronyms Used (continued)

Who is Frost & Sullivan

What Makes Us Unique

TEAM Methodology

Our Global Footprint 40+ Offices

Related Research
This study analyses the power infrastructure sector in East African countries of Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda and covers electricity generation, transmission and distribution. East Africa has the lowest access to electrical power and smallest per capita generation, as compared to the other regions in the African continent. The demand for electricity in East Africa is expected to grow at approximately 5.3%, annually. Governments in this region have prioritised energy development and diversification. The potential for development of power infrastructure creates substantial opportunities for investors, globally. This study delves into the unique opportunities and challenges of the East African region and individual countries.
More Information
No Index Yes
Podcast No
Author Joanita Roos
Industries Energy
WIP Number M977-01-00-00-00
Is Prebook No