Real-time Cities—Second Wave Cities

Real-time Cities—Second Wave Cities

Coordination Challenges and the Opportunity of Needs-driven Technology Deployment in Brussels, Oslo, and Manchester

RELEASE DATE
31-May-2016
REGION
Europe
Research Code: MC41-01-00-00-00
SKU: IT03076-EU-MR_18612

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Description

Cities are increasingly seeing an opportunity to stimulate economic growth by opening up their substantial sources of data to digital services innovators. Differentiation, however, lies in the foundations they set in terms of data strategy, governance structures, and partnerships. Second wave cities and towns lack comprehensive funding for projects so seek experience from larger cities in their regions whilst minimising risk, CAPEX, and OPEX. Successful second wave cities invest in their ability to absorb best practices and new technologies and manage partnerships while strengthening skills in utlising a variety of financial instruments, such as public-private partnerships, grants, and loans. Brussels, Oslo, and Manchester are studied here.

Table of Contents

Key Findings

Key Findings (continued)

Definitions and Study Objectives

Scope—Europe

Research Methodology

Overview—Brussels

Overview—Real-time City Initiative(s)

Objectives—Brussels Capital Region

Objectives—City of Brussels

Data Strategy—Brussels Capital Region

Data Strategy—City of Brussels: Smart City Project Inventory

Data Strategy—City of Brussels: Data Provision and Access Platform

Data Strategy—City of Brussels: Data Provision and Access Platform (continued)

Data Strategy—Overall Priorities

Data Strategy—Ownership of Data Sets

Partners and ICT Suppliers

Funding and Budgets

Overview—Oslo

Overview—Smart City Initiative(s)

Overview—Smart City Initiative(s) (continued)

Objectives—Smart City Initiative(s)

Data Strategy

Data Strategy—Ownership of Data Sets

Partners and ICT Suppliers

Funding and Budgets

Overview—Manchester

Overview—Smart City Initiative(s): Strategy

Overview—Smart City Initiative(s): Strategy (continued)

Manchester City Council—Recent and Current Developments

Objectives

Objectives (continued)

Smart City Projects

Evolving Smart City Innovation Ecosystem of Manchester

Open Data Manchester

Manchester Open Data Catalogue

DataGM—A Data Store for the City-Region

DataGM—A Data Store for the City-Region (continued)

Open Data Manchester

Greater Manchester Data Synchronisation Programme

CityVerve—UK IoT Demonstrator

CityVerve—UK IoT Demonstrator (continued)

GM-Connect—Greater Manchester’s Strategic Data Sharing Initiative

Data Strategy

Data Strategy (continued)

Data Strategy—Ownership of Data Sets

Partners and ICT Suppliers

Funding and Budgets

Comparative Assessment

Legal Disclaimer

The Frost & Sullivan Story

Value Proposition: Future of Your Company & Career

Global Perspective

Industry Convergence

360º Research Perspective

Implementation Excellence

Our Blue Ocean Strategy

Related Research
Cities are increasingly seeing an opportunity to stimulate economic growth by opening up their substantial sources of data to digital services innovators. Differentiation, however, lies in the foundations they set in terms of data strategy, governance structures, and partnerships. Second wave cities and towns lack comprehensive funding for projects so seek experience from larger cities in their regions whilst minimising risk, CAPEX, and OPEX. Successful second wave cities invest in their ability to absorb best practices and new technologies and manage partnerships while strengthening skills in utlising a variety of financial instruments, such as public-private partnerships, grants, and loans. Brussels, Oslo, and Manchester are studied here.
More Information
No Index No
Podcast No
Author Martin Hoff ter Heide
Industries Information Technology
WIP Number MC41-01-00-00-00
Is Prebook No