Securing Enterprise Communications

Securing Enterprise Communications

Enterprise-Grade Encrypted Voice and Instant Messaging

RELEASE DATE
17-May-2018
REGION
Europe
Research Code: 9856-00-26-00-00
SKU: IT03682-EU-MR_21924
$1,500.00
In stock
SKU
IT03682-EU-MR_21924
$1,500.00
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Description

The use of encrypted voice and instant messaging technology has been increasing amongst enterprise and private individuals alike for several years. Unfortunately, much of the discourse about secure communications in the mainstream media has involved government arguments against the use of encryption in the private sector instead of focusing on why secure communications are needed today and how they will help to protect intellectual property and economic growth.

The single biggest event that has driven the growth of enterprise class encrypted communications was when Edward Snowden, a former NSA subcontractor, revealed the breadth and depth of domestic and international surveillance by intelligence agencies. The public revelation that a friendly US government was also tapping the phones of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and German Chancellor Angela Merkel forced European enterprises to reflect on the security and privacy of sensitive telephone conversations.

Following those revelations came the next big wake up call. Gemalto, the largest mobile SIM card manufacturer in the world, confirmed it had been targeted by a sophisticated campaign to breach its network and compromise the encryption keys used to prevent eavesdropping on mobile telephone conversations.

The news about Gemalto was followed by the news of a high-profile data breach during the 2016 Presidential campaign in the United States that led the Democratic candidate and her team to use the encrypted communications app Signal.
Those incidents, and other lower profile ones, reminded European organisations about the dangers of unencrypted communications and extrajudicial surveillance which helped boost the secure communications industry. Despite the fact that some governments have characterised encrypted communications as technology used exclusively by people and businesses with something to hide, the truth is quite different.

The facts are that government- or criminal-sponsored espionage has never been easier or as risk free as it is today, and European economies rely heavily on intellectual property (IP) that can be intercepted by cyber adversaries when a business uses insecure methods of communication on smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Thus, the smartest choice is to encrypt communications whenever possible.

While many companies trying to enhance communication security begin with email, far too many fail to consider securing voice, instant messaging, and conference calls, all of which have been compromised by non-governmental adversaries in the past. This is why it is critical for companies that are communicating about issues such as valuable IP, strategic business planning, financial accounting, acquisitions, competitive bids, and more need to ensure the security of voice and instant message communications in addition to email.

This growth insight will focuses on secured voice and instant message communications in the private sector. It also examines technology trends, market drivers and restraints, offers a short-term forecast of the global total addressable market potential, and includes segment titled ‘Insights for Enterprise End Users’, to help CIOs and CSOs in every industry understand key issues around this technology. Takeaways from Insights for Enterprise End-Users will help organisations determine which solutions most closely meet their business needs.

Table of Contents

Enterprise Grade Encrypted Voice and Instant Messaging

Related Research
The use of encrypted voice and instant messaging technology has been increasing amongst enterprise and private individuals alike for several years. Unfortunately, much of the discourse about secure communications in the mainstream media has involved government arguments against the use of encryption in the private sector instead of focusing on why secure communications are needed today and how they will help to protect intellectual property and economic growth. The single biggest event that has driven the growth of enterprise class encrypted communications was when Edward Snowden, a former NSA subcontractor, revealed the breadth and depth of domestic and international surveillance by intelligence agencies. The public revelation that a friendly US government was also tapping the phones of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and German Chancellor Angela Merkel forced European enterprises to reflect on the security and privacy of sensitive telephone conversations. Following those revelations came the next big wake up call. Gemalto, the largest mobile SIM card manufacturer in the world, confirmed it had been targeted by a sophisticated campaign to breach its network and compromise the encryption keys used to prevent eavesdropping on mobile telephone conversations. The news about Gemalto was followed by the news of a high-profile data breach during the 2016 Presidential campaign in the United States that led the Democratic candidate and her team to use the encrypted communications app Signal. Those incidents, and other lower profile ones, reminded European organisations about the dangers of unencrypted communications and extrajudicial surveillance which helped boost the secure communications industry. Despite the fact that some governments have characterised encrypted communications as technology used exclusively by people and businesses with something to hide, the truth is quite different. The facts are that government- or criminal-sponsored espionage has never b
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No Index No
Podcast No
Industries Information Technology
WIP Number 9856-00-26-00-00
Is Prebook No
GPS Codes 9518,9659,9705-C1,9856-74,9AA6-C1