Global Benchmarking of Select Cities and their Data and Digital Strategies, 2021

Global Benchmarking of Select Cities and their Data and Digital Strategies, 2021

Cities with a Well-structured Digital Strategy will be able to Dramatically Enhance Livability

RELEASE DATE
02-Jun-2021
REGION
North America
Research Code: MG24-01-00-00-00
SKU: AU02168-NA-MT_25477

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Description

Digitization is the bedrock of new technology and services expansion, new mobility solutions, and smart applications in city management. Its purview extends across a city’s digital performance and digital strategy. In terms of digital performance, this measures how a city fares in terms of smartphone penetration, 4G coverage and speed, its 5G outlook, data security measures, and innovation profile. A city’s digital strategy embraces, among other things, real-time data availability, integrated APIs, advanced analytical capabilities, and the appointment of a dedicated Chief Digital Officer (CDO). This aspect is equally important in determining the scale and velocity of digitization initiatives in a city. Southeast Asian cities lead the pack, as governments are more proactive about implementing digital solutions and collaborate with private players and the general public to innovate solutions that address common challenges. European cities, such as London, Helsinki, and Amsterdam follow close behind, as they have well-defined digital strategies and implementation timelines. Though US cities, such as Austin and New York, have the infrastructure in place (e.g., 5G networks and open data portals), they are slightly slower at implementing digital solutions when compared to other cities analyzed in this research service.

Cities should start transitioning toward smart digital systems that can give them a view of the entire city on a single screen. They should follow the lead of Seoul and Singapore when it comes to setting up the necessary infrastructure— intelligent traffic systems, smart street lighting, waste management systems, and open data portals—to create a smart digital ecosystem. They should bring together citizens, the private sector, and research institutions to collaboratively develop technology solutions that can enhance livability.

Solution providers from the ICT and automotive sectors should focus on deeper collaboration with various stakeholders, including city governments, to develop highly scalable and robust smart city mobility OS that can converge, process, and supply intelligence that will ensure seamless operations. Traditional industries, including automotive and transportation, are projected to capitalize on digital technologies and develop more platform-based business models. Big data, crowdsourcing platforms, connected devices, and AI will shape the future mobility of both goods and passengers.

Author: Albert Geraldine Priya

RESEARCH: INFOGRAPHIC

This infographic presents a brief overview of the research, and highlights the key topics discussed in it.
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Table of Contents

Why Is It Increasingly Difficult to Grow?

The Strategic Imperative 8™ Data and Digital Strategy of Smart Cities

The Impact of Strategic Imperative 8™ on Data and Digital Strategy of Smart Cities

Growth Opportunities Fuel the Growth Pipeline Engine™

Digital Solution Central to the Transformation of a Smart City

What is a Data-driven Digital City?

Evolution of City Data Platforms

Key Requirements of Digital City

Internet and Smartphone Fundamental to Sustain Digital Platforms

Chief Digital Officer Holds the Key to Creating a Digital City

5G Digital Rollout and Key Agencies

City Open Data Strategies and Applications

Integration in Advance Payment Systems is Crucial to Launch Smart Connected Mobility Solutions

Data and Digital Strategy of Smart Cities—Benchmarking

Scope of Analysis

Growth Drivers for Data and Digital Strategy of Smart Cities

Growth Restraints for Digital and Data Strategies

Overview of London City

London Digital Strategy

London Digital Strategy (continued)

London Datastore

Real-time Applications of London Datastore

London—Toward Building a Mobility Operating System

London—Emerging Technology Charter

Overview of Paris City

Paris Digital Strategy

Paris Datastore

Real-time Applications of Open Data Paris

Paris—Toward Building a Mobility Operating System

Overview of Zurich City

Zurich—Key Digital Initiatives

Zurich—Key Digital Initiatives (continued)

Zurich—Digital City Initiatives

Zurich—Digital City Initiatives (continued)

Virtual Zurich—Digital Twin, 3D Model of the City

Overview of Helsinki City

Helsinki City Data Strategy

Helsinki City Data Strategy (continued)

Helsinki—Becoming City-as-a-data Platform

Helsinki—Becoming City-as-a-data Platform (continued)

3D and Virtual Helsinki

Overview of Amsterdam City

Amsterdam Smart City

Amsterdam Open Data

Amsterdam Smart City—Digital City

Amsterdam Smart City—Digital City (continued)

Amsterdam Smart City—Smart Mobility

Overview of New York City

New York—Open Data Platform

New York City Digitization Movement—Digital Office

New York Smart Mobility Operating System

New York—Smart City with Smart Infrastructure

New York City—3D Model

Overview of Austin City

Austin Digital Strategy

Austin—Smart City Digital Initiatives

Austin Digitization Movement

Austin Smart Mobility Operating System, a Case Study

Overview of Seoul City

Seoul Smart City Platform

Seoul Smart City Platform (continued)

Seoul Open Data Plaza

Seoul—Transformation into a Smart City

Seoul—Transformation into a Smart City (continued)

Overview of Singapore City

Singapore Smart Nation—Open Data Sources and Platform

Singapore Digitization Movement—Singapore Digital Office

Singapore—Strategic Digital National Projects and Milestones

Singapore Smart Mobility Operating System—A Case Study

Singapore Smart City with Smart Homes

Virtual Singapore, a 3D Model

Overview of Hong Kong City

Hong Kong Smart City Blue Print

Hong Kong Smart City Blue Print—Smart Living

Hong Kong Smart City Blue Print—Smart Government

Hong Kong Smart City Blue Print—Smart Government (continued)

Hong Kong Smart City Blue Print—Smart Economy

Hong Kong City—3D City Map

Growth Opportunity 1—Advanced Technology and Intelligent Solutions: A Must to Enable Smart Mobility of the Future

Growth Opportunity 1—Advanced Technology and Intelligent Solutions: A Must to Enable Smart Mobility of the Future (continued)

Growth Opportunity 2—Smart City Management Systems: The Future Operating Platform for Cities

Growth Opportunity 2—Smart City Management Systems: The Future Operating Platform for Cities (continued)

Growth Opportunity 3—Cities are Starting to Build the Stepping Stones to Advance toward an Autonomous Future

Growth Opportunity 3—Cities are Starting to Build the Stepping Stones to Advance toward an Autonomous Future (continued)

Your Next Steps

Why Frost, Why Now?

List of Exhibits

List of Exhibits (continued)

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Related Research
Digitization is the bedrock of new technology and services expansion, new mobility solutions, and smart applications in city management. Its purview extends across a city’s digital performance and digital strategy. In terms of digital performance, this measures how a city fares in terms of smartphone penetration, 4G coverage and speed, its 5G outlook, data security measures, and innovation profile. A city’s digital strategy embraces, among other things, real-time data availability, integrated APIs, advanced analytical capabilities, and the appointment of a dedicated Chief Digital Officer (CDO). This aspect is equally important in determining the scale and velocity of digitization initiatives in a city. Southeast Asian cities lead the pack, as governments are more proactive about implementing digital solutions and collaborate with private players and the general public to innovate solutions that address common challenges. European cities, such as London, Helsinki, and Amsterdam follow close behind, as they have well-defined digital strategies and implementation timelines. Though US cities, such as Austin and New York, have the infrastructure in place (e.g., 5G networks and open data portals), they are slightly slower at implementing digital solutions when compared to other cities analyzed in this research service. Cities should start transitioning toward smart digital systems that can give them a view of the entire city on a single screen. They should follow the lead of Seoul and Singapore when it comes to setting up the necessary infrastructure— intelligent traffic systems, smart street lighting, waste management systems, and open data portals—to create a smart digital ecosystem. They should bring together citizens, the private sector, and research institutions to collaboratively develop technology solutions that can enhance livability. Solution providers from the ICT and automotive sectors should focus on deeper collaboration with various stakeholders, including city governments, to develop highly scalable and robust smart city mobility OS that can converge, process, and supply intelligence that will ensure seamless operations. Traditional industries, including automotive and transportation, are projected to capitalize on digital technologies and develop more platform-based business models. Big data, crowdsourcing platforms, connected devices, and AI will shape the future mobility of both goods and passengers. Author: Albert Geraldine Priya
More Information
No Index No
Podcast No
Author Albert Geraldine Priya
Industries Automotive
WIP Number MG24-01-00-00-00
Is Prebook No
GPS Codes 9673-A6,9800-A6,9807-A6,9813-A6,9A57-A6,9AF6-A6