Growth Opportunities for Compound Semiconductors in Automotive

Growth Opportunities for Compound Semiconductors in Automotive

Vehicle Electrification and Need for High-efficiency High-voltage Charging Systems to Drive Growth Potential

RELEASE DATE
30-Oct-2023
REGION
Global
Deliverable Type
Technology Research
Research Code: DAB4-01-00-00-00
SKU: ES_2023_269
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Description

A compound semiconductor (CS) consists of two or more elements from different groups in the periodic table, such as gallium arsenide (GaAs), GaN, indium phosphide (InP), and silicon germanium. In the automotive industry, CSs have several advantages over elemental semiconductors (e.g., silicon [Si]). They operate at higher frequencies and temperatures, have higher electron mobility, and exhibit superior optical and electronic properties. This makes them ideal for high-speed charging systems, laser headlights, light detection and ranging (LiDAR), and high-speed sensors.

For example, because CSs have a wide band gap (WBG), they produce less heat than elemental semiconductors, thus losing less energy. This makes them suitable for manufacturing electric vehicle (EV) charging components. Manufacturers also use CSs to produce high-speed laser diodes, which are essential components in autonomous vehicles (AVs).

Emerging automotive concepts, such as AVs and vehicle-to-everything (V2X), are attracting significant global traction. CSs, such as GaAs, InP, and GaN, play a vital role in these emerging concepts. Overall, a CS is a critical component of modern vehicles, enabling the development of electric, autonomous, and connected vehicles.

This report covers the following modules:

Key Drivers and Challenges Influencing CS Development and Adoption
Technology Landscape
Stakeholder Ecosystem
Supplier Landscape
Strategic Developments
Geopolitical Analysis
Plant Expansion Plans
Technology Roadmap

Table of Contents

Why Is It Increasingly Difficult to Grow?The Strategic Imperative 8™: Factors Creating Pressure on Growth

The Strategic Imperative 8™

The Impact of the Top 3 Strategic Imperatives of Compound Semiconductors (CSs) in the Automotive Industry

Growth Opportunities Fuel the Growth Pipeline Engine™

Research Methodology

Scope of Analysis

Segmentation of CS by Material Type

Key Findings

Growth Drivers

Growth Restraints

Presence of CS in Automobiles

Overview of CS-based Hardware in Automobiles

Technology Benchmarking of CS Used in Automobiles

Stakeholder Ecosystem of CS in Automotive

Suppliers Landscape

New Product Development Activities of Key Players

New Product Development Activities of Start-ups

Geopolitical Scenario Impacting the Adoption of CS

Regional Analysis of CS in the Automotive Industry—Asia-Pacific

Regional Analysis of CS in the Automotive Industry—Europe

Regional Analysis of CS in the Automotive Industry—North America

Investment in Capacity Expansion of Foundries (2020–2023)

Strategic Partnerships

Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As)

Technology Roadmap

Technology Roadmap (continued)

Technology Roadmap (continued)

Emerging Use Cases of CSs

Emerging Use Cases of CSs (continued)

Growth Opportunity 1: Supply Chain Consolidation

Growth Opportunity 1: Supply Chain Consolidation (continued)

Growth Opportunity 2: Strategic Partnerships Between SiC and GaN Semiconductor Suppliers

Growth Opportunity 2: Strategic Partnerships Between SiC and GaN Semiconductor Suppliers (continued)

Growth Opportunity 3: Low-cost CS Devices to Realize Higher-voltage EV Systems

Growth Opportunity 3: Low-cost CS Devices to Realize Higher-voltage EV Systems (continued)

Technology Readiness Levels (TRL): Explanation

Your Next Steps

Why Frost, Why Now?

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A compound semiconductor (CS) consists of two or more elements from different groups in the periodic table, such as gallium arsenide (GaAs), GaN, indium phosphide (InP), and silicon germanium. In the automotive industry, CSs have several advantages over elemental semiconductors (e.g., silicon [Si]). They operate at higher frequencies and temperatures, have higher electron mobility, and exhibit superior optical and electronic properties. This makes them ideal for high-speed charging systems, laser headlights, light detection and ranging (LiDAR), and high-speed sensors. For example, because CSs have a wide band gap (WBG), they produce less heat than elemental semiconductors, thus losing less energy. This makes them suitable for manufacturing electric vehicle (EV) charging components. Manufacturers also use CSs to produce high-speed laser diodes, which are essential components in autonomous vehicles (AVs). Emerging automotive concepts, such as AVs and vehicle-to-everything (V2X), are attracting significant global traction. CSs, such as GaAs, InP, and GaN, play a vital role in these emerging concepts. Overall, a CS is a critical component of modern vehicles, enabling the development of electric, autonomous, and connected vehicles. This report covers the following modules: Key Drivers and Challenges Influencing CS Development and Adoption Technology Landscape Stakeholder Ecosystem Supplier Landscape Strategic Developments Geopolitical Analysis Plant Expansion Plans Technology Roadmap
More Information
Deliverable Type Technology Research
Author Sushrutha Katta Sadashiva
Industries Electronics and Sensors
No Index No
Is Prebook No
Keyword 1 Compound Semiconductors Analysis
Keyword 2 Automotive Compound Semiconductor Trends
Keyword 3 Semiconductor Industry
Podcast No
WIP Number DAB4-01-00-00-00