Global Nanophotonics Materials: Technology Analysis

Global Nanophotonics Materials: Technology Analysis

The Growing Demand for Better Quality and Performance of Displays, Photovoltaic Cells, and Sensors Drives the Adoption of Nanophotonics Materials.

RELEASE DATE
26-Nov-2021
REGION
Global
Deliverable Type
Technology Research
Research Code: DA1A-01-00-00-00
SKU: CM01916-GL-TR_26000
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Description

Nanophotonics is the science of controlling light generation, manipulation, transport, and detection on ultra-small length scales. It is an emerging technology that involves the interaction of light with structures smaller than approximately 100nm.
The technology has a far-reaching application landscape, and photovoltaics and displays are likely to become the most attractive applications in the near future. This will be mainly due to the rising solar energy contribution in the global energy matrix, the growing space and efficiency issues for existing PV materials, and the increasing importance of high-performance consumer electronics, which will drive the need for nanophotonics material development.
This Frost & Sullivan study focuses on identifying and analyzing emerging nanophotonics materials that will overcome the challenges faced by existing materials; it also discusses methods to increase the commercial adoption of the technology in the displays, quantum computing, photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, telecom, data storage, lasers, and LED lighting industries. Emerging materials under study are divided into 7 segments, that is, metals, ceramics, polymers, nanomaterials, metamaterials, phase-change materials, and stimuli-responsive polymers.
As observed during the research, there are several sub-categories of materials being researched and tested in nanophotonics technology - from metal alloys and ceramics to quantum dots and metamaterials. Metals and ceramics-based nanophotonic materials are already in use in several applications such as medical, telecom, quantum computing, lasers, and data processing. Among the emerging material segments, quantum dots are one of the most attractive materials, and they are seeing substantial commercial adoption, mainly in applications such as displays, photovoltaics, and LED lighting, whereas metamaterials hold potential in medical imaging and sensor applications. Data processing applications such as quantum computing continue to prefer ceramic-based materials (silicon photonics) due to their high thermal stability; however, other high-performance materials are also being tested.
Frost & Sullivan’s IP analysis identified that IP activity is largely concentrated in the United States and Asia-Pacific due to the increasing funding support from well-established device manufacturers such as Samsung and LG. Moreover, the R&D in the material segment has been rising over the past 2-3 years, and most of the developments are promising at the theoretical level. The reason behind the gap between the development and the deployment of material technology is the lack of commercial production tools for the implementation of the new materials.
Key questions this study answers:
What are the existing and the emerging materials needed to develop nanophotonics products and components?
What are the stakeholder activities in nanophotonics material R&D and commercialization?
What are the growth opportunities for nanophotonics application material developers?

Table of Contents

1.1 The Strategic Imperative 8™Factors creating Pressure on Growth in the Nanophotonics Materials Market

1.2 The Strategic Imperative 8™

1.3 The Impact of the Top Three Strategic Imperatives on the Nanophotonics Materials Industry

1.4 About the Growth Pipeline Engine™

1.5 Growth Opportunities Fuel the Growth Pipeline Engine™

1.6 Research Methodology

2.1 Research Context

2.2 Research Scope and Key Questions the Study Will Answer

2.3 Key Findings

3.1 Photovoltaics, Lighting, Sensors, Telecom, and Imaging Applications are Driving Demand for Nanophotonics

3.2 LED Lighting and Optical Interconnects are Emerging Applications; Photovoltaics Drives Current Demand

3.3 Market Consolidation Is Emerging as an Important Trend

3.4 Scalability and the Lack of Real-time Use-cases Hinder Mass Commercialization

3.5 The Rising Demand for Active Tunable Devices Is Driving Material Development

3.6 Metals, Ceramics, and Polymers Have Been Commercialized for Nanophotonics Applications

3.7 A Lack of Standardized Processes and Limited Fundamental Research Hinder Material Adoption

4.1 Among Metal-based Nanophotonics Materials, Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Are Witnessing the Highest Adoption

4.2 Structural Modifications Can Increase the Adoption of Aluminum and Copper-based Nanophotonics Metals

4.3 Silica, ZnO, and III-nitrides Are the Most Common Materials Used in the Preparation of Photonic Crystal Fibers

4.4 Photovoltaics Is Likely to Drive the Demand for Germanium and III-nitride Nanophotonics Materials

4.5 Easy Integration and the Ability to Customize Optical Properties Make Polymers the Material of Choice

4.6 Polystyrene and Amorphous Polycarbonate (APC) Exhibit Relatively Higher Refractive Indices than Other Polymers

4.7 Carbon Nanotubes Are Preferred for Field-emission Displays

4.8 A High Refractive Index Boosts Diamond’s Potential for Use in Optoelectric and Sensing Device Applications

4.9 vdW Materials Are Demonstrating Potential for Use in Nanophotonics Structure Integration

4.10 The Sensitivity of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (TMDCs) to the Surrounding Environment Will Drive Its Use in Sensor Applications

4.11 GaAs Nanowires Can Be Used in Next-generation Optical and Sensing Devices

4.12 Gold-Silver Alloys Are Finding Potential Use in Bio-sensing Applications

4.13 A Large Band Gap Makes Ingap Nanowires Suitable for Solar Energy and Lighting Applications

4.14 OLED and QLED Are Propelling QD Demand

4.15 AZO Can Work as a Low-cost Alternative to Conventional Nanophotonics Materials

4.16 Silicene Offers Graphene-like Properties with Enhanced Compatibility

4.17 Low-loss and Ultra-fast Switching Speed Facilitates PCM Usage In Optoelectric Devices

4.18 Stimuli-responsive Polymers Find Potential Use in Sensors

5.1 The Need for Customized Optoelectric Properties to Target Multiple Applications Is Fueling Material Development

5.2 QDs Hold Application Potential Across Several Fucntions, Including Sensing, Imaging, and Data Storage

6.1 Over the Past 2 Years, Nanophotonics Technology Funding Has Received a Boost

6.2 Research Institutes’ Contributions to the Innovation Ecosystem Are Rising

6.3 Partnerships Focus on Product Portfolio Expansion

6.4 IP Analysis Showcases an Increase in Patent Filing Activity from 2016 to 2020

6.5 QDs and PCMs Dominate IP Filing Due to the Growing Demand for Tunable Materials

7.1 Nanosys Inc. Focuses on Increasing the Adoption of QDs and Micro LEDs for Displays

7.2 PsiQuantum Uses Silicon Photonic Materials for Quantum Computing Applications

7.3 TriEye Ltd Is Solving the Low Visibility Challenge for Sensors and Imaging Applications

7.4 nanoComposix’s Gold Nanoshells Are Gaining Acceptance in Sensors and Therapeutics Applications

7.5 Quantum Materials’s QDs and Unique Light Signature Can Find Potential Usage in Anti-counterfeiting Applications

7.6 UbiQD’s Solar Windows Are Positioned as Viable Smart Building Solutions

8.1 Growth Opportunity 1: Metasurfaces for Biomedical Imaging and Sensing Applications

8.1 Growth Opportunity 1: Metasurfaces for Biomedical Imaging and Sensing Applications (continued)

8.2 Growth Opportunity 2: Heat-assisted Magnetic Resonance (HAMR) for HDD Storage Applications

8.2 Growth Opportunity 2: Heat-assisted Magnetic Resonance (HAMR) for HDD Storage Applications (continued)

8.3 Growth Opportunity 3: Ultra-efficient Thermophotovoltaics for the Solar Energy Sector

8.3 Growth Opportunity 3: Ultra-efficient Thermophotovoltaics for the Solar Energy Sector (continued)

9.1 Technology Readiness Levels (TRL): Explanation

9.2 Partial List of Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Study

10.1 Your Next Steps

10.2 Why Frost, Why Now?

Legal Disclaimer

Nanophotonics is the science of controlling light generation, manipulation, transport, and detection on ultra-small length scales. It is an emerging technology that involves the interaction of light with structures smaller than approximately 100nm. The technology has a far-reaching application landscape, and photovoltaics and displays are likely to become the most attractive applications in the near future. This will be mainly due to the rising solar energy contribution in the global energy matrix, the growing space and efficiency issues for existing PV materials, and the increasing importance of high-performance consumer electronics, which will drive the need for nanophotonics material development. This Frost & Sullivan study focuses on identifying and analyzing emerging nanophotonics materials that will overcome the challenges faced by existing materials; it also discusses methods to increase the commercial adoption of the technology in the displays, quantum computing, photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, telecom, data storage, lasers, and LED lighting industries. Emerging materials under study are divided into 7 segments, that is, metals, ceramics, polymers, nanomaterials, metamaterials, phase-change materials, and stimuli-responsive polymers. As observed during the research, there are several sub-categories of materials being researched and tested in nanophotonics technology - from metal alloys and ceramics to quantum dots and metamaterials. Metals and ceramics-based nanophotonic materials are already in use in several applications such as medical, telecom, quantum computing, lasers, and data processing. Among the emerging material segments, quantum dots are one of the most attractive materials, and they are seeing substantial commercial adoption, mainly in applications such as displays, photovoltaics, and LED lighting, whereas metamaterials hold potential in medical imaging and sensor applications. Data processing applications such as quantum computing continue to prefer ceramic-based materials (silicon photonics) due to their high thermal stability; however, other high-performance materials are also being tested. Frost & Sullivan’s IP analysis identified that IP activity is largely concentrated in the United States and Asia-Pacific due to the increasing funding support from well-established device manufacturers such as Samsung and LG. Moreover, the R&D in the material segment has been rising over the past 2-3 years, and most of the developments are promising at the theoretical level. The reason behind the gap between the development and the deployment of material technology is the lack of commercial production tools for the implementation of the new materials. Key questions this study answers: What are the existing and the emerging materials needed to develop nanophotonics products and components What are the stakeholder activities in nanophotonics material R&D and commercialization What are the growth opportunities for nanophotonics application material developers
More Information
Deliverable Type Technology Research
No Index No
Podcast No
Author Narendra Kumar Singh
Industries Chemicals and Materials
WIP Number DA1A-01-00-00-00
Keyword 1 Nanophotonics Technology Trends
Keyword 2 Nanophotonics Materials
Keyword 3 silicon photonics
Is Prebook No