Growth Opportunities in Hydrogen as a Commercial Aviation Fuel

Growth Opportunities in Hydrogen as a Commercial Aviation Fuel

Overcoming Production, Storage, and Cost Challenges Will Drive Green Hydrogen Adoption as an Aviation Fuel

RELEASE DATE
19-Oct-2022
REGION
Global
Deliverable Type
Market Research
Research Code: PDC4-01-00-00-00
SKU: AE01633-GL-MR_26955
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Description

Traditional jet fuel comes from processing fossil fuels. As a result, its use in the aviation industry significantly increases carbon emissions, which are responsible for global warming and climate change. This study analyzes hydrogen use as aviation fuel. Along with sustainable fuels, industry stakeholders are looking at technologies such as direct electric propulsion as alternatives for jet fuel.

The two primary methods for hydrogen use are fuel cells and direct combustion. Fuel cells deliver the cleanest outputs, making it preferable over direct hydrogen combustion, which emits nitrous oxides.

The hydrogen extraction method also determines its overall contribution to controlling emissions. Derived from fossil fuels, grey hydrogen is not entirely carbon emission-free as the extraction process releases carbon. Blue hydrogen, which is similarly derived, uses carbon capture techniques but is not wholly effective. The major difference in emissions control is achievable through green hydrogen usage, which is from renewable sources and is the cleanest.

Adjacent industries, such as automotive, space, and shipping, are adopting hydrogen. Frost & Sullivan expects this development to drive its adoption in the aviation industry. As any new technology has pros and cons, stakeholders involved in hydrogen propulsion technology development, such as aircraft manufacturers, are working toward countering the challenges associated with hydrogen adoption.

Other information includes:
• Various hydrogen production processes and hydrogen utilization
• Challenges in managing hydrogen
• The current scenario in hydrogen adoption as an aviation fuel

Table of Contents

Why is it Increasingly Difficult to Grow?

The Strategic Imperative 8™

The Impact of the Top 3 Strategic Imperatives on Hydrogen Adoption as a Fuel in the Aviation Industry

Growth Opportunities Fuel the Growth Pipeline Engine™

Growth Drivers

Growth Restraints

CO2 Emissions—Current Scenario and Industry Mandates

Available Alternatives to Traditional Jet Fuel

Hydrogen Extraction Processes

The Positive and Negative Aspects of Using Hydrogen as a Fuel

Primary Challenges and the Way Forward

Hydrogen Adoption as a Fuel in Adjacent Industries

Key Aviation Industry Developments

Major Partnerships

Growth Opportunity 1—Form Long-term Partnerships with Stakeholders

Growth Opportunity 1—Form Long-term Partnerships with Stakeholders (continued)

Growth Opportunity 2—Airports to Lead Hydrogen Fuel Adoption in the Aviation Industry

Growth Opportunity 2—Airports to Lead Hydrogen Fuel Adoption in the Aviation Industry (continued)

Growth Opportunity 3—Direct Hydrogen Propulsion R&D Toward Long-haul Flights

Growth Opportunity 3—Direct Hydrogen Propulsion R&D Toward Long-haul Flights (continued)

Growth Opportunity 4—Raise Hydrogen Fuel Awareness in Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Africa

Growth Opportunity 4—Raise Hydrogen Fuel Awareness in Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Africa (continued)

Conclusion

List of Exhibits

Legal Disclaimer

Traditional jet fuel comes from processing fossil fuels. As a result, its use in the aviation industry significantly increases carbon emissions, which are responsible for global warming and climate change. This study analyzes hydrogen use as aviation fuel. Along with sustainable fuels, industry stakeholders are looking at technologies such as direct electric propulsion as alternatives for jet fuel. The two primary methods for hydrogen use are fuel cells and direct combustion. Fuel cells deliver the cleanest outputs, making it preferable over direct hydrogen combustion, which emits nitrous oxides. The hydrogen extraction method also determines its overall contribution to controlling emissions. Derived from fossil fuels, grey hydrogen is not entirely carbon emission-free as the extraction process releases carbon. Blue hydrogen, which is similarly derived, uses carbon capture techniques but is not wholly effective. The major difference in emissions control is achievable through green hydrogen usage, which is from renewable sources and is the cleanest. Adjacent industries, such as automotive, space, and shipping, are adopting hydrogen. Frost & Sullivan expects this development to drive its adoption in the aviation industry. As any new technology has pros and cons, stakeholders involved in hydrogen propulsion technology development, such as aircraft manufacturers, are working toward countering the challenges associated with hydrogen adoption. Other information includes: • Various hydrogen production processes and hydrogen utilization • Challenges in managing hydrogen • The current scenario in hydrogen adoption as an aviation fuel
More Information
Deliverable Type Market Research
Author Vedhas Sabnis
Industries Aerospace, Defence and Security
No Index No
Is Prebook No
Podcast No
WIP Number PDC4-01-00-00-00