Competitive Intensity of High speed Rail and Its Effect on Regional Airlines

Competitive Intensity of High speed Rail and Its Effect on Regional Airlines

Strategic Partnerships and Intermodal Connectivity to Propel Growth

RELEASE DATE
15-Sep-2022
REGION
Global
Research Code: PD7F-01-00-00-00
SKU: AE01627-GL-MT_26907
$2,450.00
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$2,450.00
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Description

High-speed trains travel at a minimum speed of 250 kmph or 155 mph. This report explores the current status of high-speed rail and how it is affecting airlines in different markets.

Airlines that once saw low-cost carriers as their only threat are now encountering more competition from high-speed rail operators, especially as some develop lower-cost services. Legacy airlines are considering their options to compete with—or even collaborate with—rail operators, low-cost carriers, and each other to provide better service, remain cost competitive, and retain customers by giving them additional options for their itineraries.

High-speed rail in Europe has seen growth and has replaced some domestic routes, but the intra-Europe market still presents numerous opportunities for air carriers with plenty of routes that are either underserved or not served by rail. Travel in India and the United States is still ruled by airlines. The US rail network is poorly developed, and India is still a growing market for air travel. Japan, the innovator of high-speed rail with its bullet train, has many domestic travelers who use both air and rail service. High-speed rail service in China, the country with the most route kilometers of any in the world, has prompted some airlines to remove short-haul flights, but medium-haul flights are giving rail tough competition.

Author: Nripendra Bahadur Singh

Table of Contents

Why is it Increasingly Difficult to Grow?

The Strategic Imperative 8™

The Impact of the Top 3 Strategic Imperatives on the Regional Airline Industry

Growth Opportunities Fuel the Growth Pipeline Engine™

Growth Drivers

Growth Restraints

The Pandemic’s Effects on Air Travel

The Pandemic’s Effects on Air Travel (continued)

The Pandemic’s Effects on Air Travel (continued)

How Airlines are Competing in Europe

How Airlines are Competing in Japan and China

How Airlines are Competing in United States and India

Winning Points for High-speed Rail

Winning Points for Airlines

Air and Rail Partnerships

Growth Opportunity 1: Collaboration between Airlines and High-speed Rail

Growth Opportunity 1: Collaboration between Airlines and High-speed Rail (continued)

Growth Opportunity 2: Interlining Agreements with Regional Carriers

Growth Opportunity 2: Interlining Agreements with Regional Carriers (continued)

Growth Opportunity 3: Setting Up a Regional Airline

Growth Opportunity 3: Setting Up a Regional Airline (continued)

List of Exhibits

Legal Disclaimer

High-speed trains travel at a minimum speed of 250 kmph or 155 mph. This report explores the current status of high-speed rail and how it is affecting airlines in different markets. Airlines that once saw low-cost carriers as their only threat are now encountering more competition from high-speed rail operators, especially as some develop lower-cost services. Legacy airlines are considering their options to compete with—or even collaborate with—rail operators, low-cost carriers, and each other to provide better service, remain cost competitive, and retain customers by giving them additional options for their itineraries. High-speed rail in Europe has seen growth and has replaced some domestic routes, but the intra-Europe market still presents numerous opportunities for air carriers with plenty of routes that are either underserved or not served by rail. Travel in India and the United States is still ruled by airlines. The US rail network is poorly developed, and India is still a growing market for air travel. Japan, the innovator of high-speed rail with its bullet train, has many domestic travelers who use both air and rail service. High-speed rail service in China, the country with the most route kilometers of any in the world, has prompted some airlines to remove short-haul flights, but medium-haul flights are giving rail tough competition. Author: Nripendra Bahadur Singh
More Information
Author Nripendra Bahadur Singh
Industries Aerospace, Defence and Security
No Index No
Is Prebook No
Podcast No
WIP Number PD7F-01-00-00-00