Benchmarking of OEMs’ Mobility Strategies

Benchmarking of OEMs’ Mobility Strategies

From Mobility Service to Purpose-built Vehicle for Shared Mobility—Shifting Growth Strategies for OEMs

RELEASE DATE
16-Nov-2022
REGION
Global
Deliverable Type
Market Research
Research Code: MGBC-01-00-00-00
SKU: AU02445-GL-MT_27121
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Description

People are moving away from car ownership to usership models. As cost of ownership and cities' push for sustainable modes increase, the uptake of alternative mobility modes will also rise.

Cities are framing regulations to promote the use of shared mobility modes. With car ownership set to decrease, OEMs are looking at expanding the relevance of their service lines and exerting greater control over the customer value chain. From supplying vehicles for shared mobility to operating shared service and offering aftermarket and fleet management services, OEMs are expanding their capabilities. Mergers, acquisitions, portfolio expansions, and product development and manufacturing capabilities will create new entry barriers over the next 5 years. The OEM approach to future mobility products and services is based on their capability to offer fully connected, automated, and digital experiences over 5 to 8 years.

This research service aims to understand the global presence of OEMs in shared mobility (products and services) and to explore new opportunities for growth. The study offers top-level analysis of various automakers and benchmarks their mobility solutions. Mercedes Benz, BMW, Stellantis, Renault Group, Volkswagen(Skoda, SEAT, and Porsche), Nissan Group, General Motors, Toyota Group, Volvo Group, Honda Group, Hyundai (Kia), and Ford Group are some of the OEMs covered here. Mobility services include carsharing, ride-hailing, flexible leasing and subscription, demand-responsive transit, micromobility sharing, ridesharing, parking, charging, and autonomous shared (shuttle and robotaxi) solutions.

Key Conclusion

1. Cities are proactively addressing post-pandemic changes in mobility patterns but would like to retain the best of such change; this will drive the uptake of shared and connected mobility modes
2. OEMs can leverage these platforms to bring their own vehicles into the fleet, which offers mobility operators certain benefits, in terms of operating cost.
3. Though the primary design focus of purpose-built vehicles is sharing space, it will move to address demand from passenger/goods transport and autonomous mobility.

Table of Contents

Why is it Increasingly Difficult to Grow?

The Strategic Imperative 8™

The Impact of the Top 3 Strategic Imperatives on OEMs’ Mobility Strategies

Growth Opportunities Fuel the Growth Pipeline Engine™

Scope of Analysis

Segmentation

Shared Mobility—Competitors

Growth Drivers

Growth Restraints

Key Findings

Why Are OEMs Launching Mobility Sub-brands?

Evolution of OEM Mobility Capabilities

OEM Mobility Strategy Approaches Taken

Comparison of OEMs’ Mobility Sub-brands and Strategies

Comparative Analysis of OEMs’ Mobility Initiatives

OEMs and the Drive-yourself Segment—Heatmap

OEMs and the Be-driven Segment—Heatmap

Why Automakers Develop PBVs

Autonomous MaaS

OEM Mobility Capabilities

Trends and Future Outlook

Competitive Environment

Conclusion

The Mercedes Benz AG Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Mercedes Benz AG Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Mercedes-Benz Group—Coverage in Mobility Solutions and Autonomous Mobility (Past to Present)

The BMW Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The BMW Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The BMW Group—Investments through BMW iVentures

The BMW Group—Alphabet Overview

Your Now Overview

Mercedes Benz and the BMW Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview through the Now Brand

Overview of Your Now Joint Ventures

Overview of ShareNow Brand (Now Free2Move)

FREE NOW Brand Overview

Overview of the FREE NOW Brand (continued)

Overview of the CHARGE NOW Brand

Mercedes Benz and BMW—The Way Ahead

The Volkswagen Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Volkswagen Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Volkswagen Group—Investment Overview

The New AUTO Strategy—The Volkswagen Group

The Volkswagen Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview Through Its Mobility Brand (Including Skoda and SEAT)

MOIA—An Overview

Europcar Mobility Group—Overview and Strategy

WeShare (acquired by Miles Mobility)—Overview

SEAT—Mobility Services Overview

A Smart and Sustainable Island—The Greek Island of Astypalea

Skoda Auto DigiLab

Porsche—Mobility Initiatives Overview

The Volkswagen Group—Autonomous Shared Mobility

The Volkswagen Group—The Way Ahead

The Stellantis Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

Stellantis Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Stellantis Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview through the Free2move Brand

Free2move’s Overall Portfolio for its Customers

The Free2move Brand—The Dare 2030 Strategy

The Free2move Brand—Overview and USP

The Free2move Brand—Regional Presence

Stellantis Ventures

Overview of Free2move Carsharing

Free2move—Business Solutions

Leasys—Overview

The Stellantis Group—The Way Ahead

The Renault Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Renault Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Renault Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview through the Mobilize Brand

Mobilize—Integrated Software System

Mobilize—Overview of PBVs and Use Cases

Vehicles as a Platform Service for Multiple Customer Touchpoints and Recurring Revenues

Mobilize Limo—The VaaS Solution for Ride-hailing

Mobilize Duo—A Deep Dive

Mobilize—Shared Mobility Brand Overview

Mobilize—Carsharing Service Overview

Mobilize—Other Shared Mobility Initiatives Overview

The Renault Group—The Way Ahead

The Nissan Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Nissan Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

Nissan Motor—Mobility Initiatives Overview

The Nissan Group—The Way Ahead

The Toyota Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Toyota Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

Toyota Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview through the Kinto Brand

The Toyota Motor Group Mobility Service Platform (MSP)

The Toyota Motor Group—Kinto Mobility

The Toyota Group—Investment Overview

Woven Planet Holdings

Woven City Overview

Woven City—Development Themes

The Toyota Group—Shared Autonomous Mobility

The Toyota Group—The Way Ahead

The GM Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The GM Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

Cruise—A Timeline Overview

Cruise—Highlights

GM—The Way Ahead

The Volvo Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Volvo Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Volvo Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview

Volvo Cars Mobility (M)

Autonomous Shared Mobility Through Partnerships 

Volvo Group—The Way Ahead

The Hyundai Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Hyundai Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Hyundai Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview

The Hyundai—Mobility Initiatives Overview

Motional—Aptiv and Hyundai Group Joint Venture

Kia Mobility—Overview

Kia’s PBV Strategy

Unique PBV from Hyundai

The Hyundai Group—The Way Ahead

The Honda Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Honda Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Honda Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview

The Honda Motor—Mobility Initiatives Overview

The Honda Group—The Way Ahead

The Ford Motor Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In

The Ford Motor Group Structure and Where Mobility Fits In (continued)

The Ford Motor Group—Mobility Initiatives Overview

Ford—The Way Ahead

Growth Opportunity 1—Vehicle Usership models

Growth Opportunity 1—Vehicle Usership Models (continued)

Growth Opportunity 2—Vehicle Suppliers for Shared Fleet

Growth Opportunity 2—Vehicle Suppliers for Shared Fleets (continued)

Growth Opportunity 3—Towards PBV and VaaS models

Growth Opportunity 3—Towards PBV and VaaS Models (continued)

Your Next Steps

Why Frost, Why Now?

List of Exhibits

Legal Disclaimer

People are moving away from car ownership to usership models. As cost of ownership and cities' push for sustainable modes increase, the uptake of alternative mobility modes will also rise. Cities are framing regulations to promote the use of shared mobility modes. With car ownership set to decrease, OEMs are looking at expanding the relevance of their service lines and exerting greater control over the customer value chain. From supplying vehicles for shared mobility to operating shared service and offering aftermarket and fleet management services, OEMs are expanding their capabilities. Mergers, acquisitions, portfolio expansions, and product development and manufacturing capabilities will create new entry barriers over the next 5 years. The OEM approach to future mobility products and services is based on their capability to offer fully connected, automated, and digital experiences over 5 to 8 years. This research service aims to understand the global presence of OEMs in shared mobility (products and services) and to explore new opportunities for growth. The study offers top-level analysis of various automakers and benchmarks their mobility solutions. Mercedes Benz, BMW, Stellantis, Renault Group, Volkswagen(Skoda, SEAT, and Porsche), Nissan Group, General Motors, Toyota Group, Volvo Group, Honda Group, Hyundai (Kia), and Ford Group are some of the OEMs covered here. Mobility services include carsharing, ride-hailing, flexible leasing and subscription, demand-responsive transit, micromobility sharing, ridesharing, parking, charging, and autonomous shared (shuttle and robotaxi) solutions.--BEGIN PROMO--

Key Conclusion

1. Cities are proactively addressing post-pandemic changes in mobility patterns but would like to retain the best of such change; this will drive the uptake of shared and connected mobility modes
2. OEMs can leverage these platforms to bring their own vehicles into the fleet, which offers mobility operators certain benefits, in terms of operating cost.
3. Though the primary design focus of purpose-built vehicles is sharing space, it will move to address demand from passenger/goods transport and autonomous mobility.

More Information
Deliverable Type Market Research
Author Avishar Dutta
Industries Automotive
No Index No
Is Prebook No
Podcast No
WIP Number MGBC-01-00-00-00